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January 04, 2008

Comments

Charles Barton

I am not sure why this story has been posted. 10 miles battery range in not very impressive. This is hardly a breakthrough in battery technology for cars.

Marcus

Thats around half the average daily round-trip commute for the USA. Not insignificant it seems to me.

IpsoFacto

Ten mile range -- what a joke. Who is USABC and why did they award a contract for such a tiny battery?

averagejoe

A PHEV-10 might fill a niche as a more affordable, entry level vehicle for the PHEV market, kind of like the role that the early VW rabbits or Honda Civics filled. I certainly would be more willing to pay $20k for PHEV-10 than $30k for a PHEV-40... as long as I had the option to add more battery packs later.

DaveMart

Whether this is impressive or not depends upon how much it costs.
Maybe 10 miles would be limiting for the States, but for many inn Europe and Japan it would do fine.

DaveMart

The article actually says this is complementary to the e-volt work, which is going to have a 40mile battery pack.
So it is a smaller, cheaper package for less demanding applications.

Dannah

I love to hear anything that moves us closer to affordable electric vehicles, but 10 miles isn't far. And just think... As time goes on, it won't even be able to make it 10 miles.

Dannah

I love to hear anything that moves us closer to affordable electric vehicles, but 10 miles isn't far. And just think... As time goes on, it won't even be able to make it 10 miles.

DaveMart

The fall-off of performance with repeated charging cycles is a lot better with some of the new generation batteries, I don't have information to hand on this specific one, but hopefully it should keep most of it's performance for many years.
What I find interesting in this proposal is that presumably it is a series hybrid, which can greatly simplify the powertrain, so it should not have to have much maintenance and that the cost of the batteries should be reasonable.
I am not sure if this is a fast-charge battery, but if you had charging facilities at work then you could double the range in a day for most commutes.

bigTom

"but if you had charging facilities at work then you could double the range in a day for most commutes."

I've been presuming that most bosses will not want to subsidize their employees driving in this manner (at least mine would be unlikely to do so). The backup approach would be roof & hood mounted PV, which would probably be reasonably well matched to a 10mile battery. On vehicle PV is probably not yet economic, but that may change within a few years.

Michael Spencer

On the positive, it could be useful as a source of power for starting from a stop and stopping in the form of regenerative braking and cutting back on fuel consumed, being light in weight and making a vehicle more efficient.

DaveMart

bigTom, our friends over at 'The Oil Drum' have convinced me that the days of cheap oil and natural gas are over (I am a hard sell!) and I really don't see gas being cheap again.
In that environment then the provision of charging points in many locations would perhaps become mandatory in many places, and the cost would be nothing remotely like that for the hypothetical hydrogen economy.
Companies would not really need to subsidise the actual power, as it is so cheeap anyway compared to buying gas.

Cyril R.

On vehicle PV is probably not yet economic, but that may change within a few years.

I'd imagine installation would be a very low cost in high volume automated production, integrated in the design. Vehicle Integrated PV, or "VI-PV"? Hmm.

And, correct me if I'm wrong, but an inverter device wouldn't be necessary for directly charging the battery in the car right? So that could be a significant cost advantage as well.

Thinfilms are lightweight but have poor efficiency for vehicles. Multi-junction is very efficient but way too expensive. Low cost, lightweight, high efficiency PV would be ideal. There's interesting developments going on in nano-silicon and nano-carbon which may lead to a suitable PV technology for automotive applications in the future.

If such a car is parked in the sun the entire weekend, then maybe it's enough for the monday commute. Finally something positive about mondays :)

eğlence

very nice topic but i hate it. :()

Stephen Boulet

My commute is fortunately under 10 miles, so I would find this interesting. It's important to get plug-ins out in the marketplace to build up mindshare, and you gotta start somewhere.

Stephen_B

GreenPlease

I'd like to see such the in-vehicle packaging be standardized with provisions to add extra batteries simply by "plugging" them in. This would be similar to the way the ATX format allows for add-in cards to simply be "plugged" in.

Battery costs will go down with volume production. No doubt. The problem is that in order to reach such a volume the price has to be reasonable! Chicken and egg problem.

This can be overcome by offering PHEVs with short ranges initially. Maybe 10 miles as posited here. The high cost of the battery (probably $1-2/Wh) would be partially masked by its relatively small size. Later on, the user could swap in three more batteries (with prices probably at $.25/Wh) to achieve a 40 mile range.

mds

BigTom,
What if you separately meter the power used by your car and reimburse your boss? Would he object to that?

Battery Supplier

Nice piece, More info from you please!

Batteries

Very informative and well written. It'll be interesting to see the developments in the coming years!.

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Batteries/Hybrid Vehicles