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March 05, 2007

Comments

Beek

Anybody who has used a CFL will tell you that it is inferior to a halogen for the purpose of natural lighting.

Funny thing is that GE did not bother to even announce their new invention, until the Australians put the fire under their feet.

Just shows that these mega-corporation bordering on monopolies have no interest in even marketing something that maybe the market would value higher. They are just giving more ammunition to the socialists with their greedy and irresponsible behavior. (But of course the socialists would never break GE apart - they would just want to rule GE and make it a state monopoly.) I would have certainly replaced all my incandescents a long time ago if this new low-fat incandescent was available.

Mitch

Hi,

"Anybody who has used a CFL will tell you that it is inferior to a halogen for the purpose of natural lighting."

Depends on the CFL. These are better than halogen:

OTT-LITE VisionSaver CFL


OTT-LITE Technology - About


OTT-LITE FAQ

Best Wishes,

Mitch

Beek

Mitch, the link does not inspire confidence. It says this CFL is "science-based blend of natural earth phosphors to be the closest thing to natural daylight". What is science-based mean? Never heard of this. Like as if there is non-science based engineering? What is "natural earth phosphors"? And how does being from "natural earth" make the light "natural daylight"? This is all nonsense without any corroborating scientific detail.

And the "technology" section is mostly about the inventor's association with Disney Studios and says nothing about the science or technology behind this CFL. This is just a marketing gimmick, and the lamp is 10 times more costly at $50.00.

rgvandewalker

Ott is the guy who popularized time-lapse phtotography of plants. In order to get some of his clips, he found he had to shoot using sunlight passed through fiber-reinforced polyester panels, because glass removed essential frequencies of the light, and various plants wouldn't ripen or bloom.
He got interested in what the components were. I first encountered Ott's work in his book, "Light for Health". He asserts that people do better under natural sunlight as well, which does not strike me as a startling discovery, just an important one.

Cervus

I think there are bigger fish to fry than banning light bulbs. Besides, I have a lot of naked bulb fixtures in my house that CFLs will look awful in or simply won't fit. I did look for bulb-style CFLs, but they were ten dollars each.

Don't take away my right to choose what kind of bulb I use.

Stephen Boulet

I agree with GE here. Society might end up shooting itself in the foot by eliminating whole technologies rather than mandating minimum efficiencies. If someone can come up with an efficient incandescent, why not?

Stephen

Mike Ambler

Stephen,

You are dead right.

From Jan 1st 2009 any retailer selling compact general purpose lighting will be fined USD100 000, distributor USD500 000 and OEM USD 1M that does not better 60 lumens / watt.

That should do it!!!!!!!!

Ciao,

Mike

Richard

Good idea in warm climates, but if you live in cooler climates in heated buildings, then heat given off as inefficiencies from incandescent bulbs offsets the energy consumed by the main building's heating systems. Aren't we just transferring one energy saving to a higher cost elsewhere in these cases?

Michael Lawson

All this knee-jerk attempted legislation makes me nervous. What about specialty areas like theatrical lighting, projection systems, and automobile light bulbs. There aren't CFL replacements for those! Any "ban" needs to be super-carefully worded.

And I think they may missing the bigger point, anyway.

The biggest energy users in my neighborhood are the electric hot water heater, the electric clothes dryer, the dishwasher, and the air conditioner. If we were to switch out the dryer with a natural gas one, replace the electric water heater with gas, tankless gas, or solar, and if we were to switch out the central heat/air with a ground-source heat pump, we would save a LOT more energy than just worrying about CFL lighting.

I personally switched my incandescents with CFL's several months ago, and have not seen really any significant difference in my electric bill. Lighting is only maybe 10% of the electric use for a month.

I do, however, enjoy the color temperature of the "daylight" CFL's in my clothes closet -- it makes me feel like there's a skylight in there...

Beek

The largest consumption of electricity in a household is the refrigerator. A bit of insulation there could do wonders.

CFLs are good for workshop conditions where the lighting can contribute to illumination of details. But for ambient natural lighting, like in a study where one is reading a book or is on the laptop, halogens (incandescents) have no rival.

John D.

I seem to have had more than my share of CFL light failures in this, my first full year with CFL's in my home. For a bulb that's supposed to last 10 years, I doubt that I'll see that in actual practice. Anyone else experiencing this?

John

Tom G

John: Yes all CFL's are not created equal. However after using them for about 10 years I have only had 2 failures. One shorted out after about 4 years and the other just plain wore out from use and was 7 years old. GE, Lights of America, and Commerical Electric are some of the brands I like. Prices have dropped lately and at Lowe's or Wal-Mart you can buy a package of 6 100W [25w] bulbs for less than $20 bucks.

I use them is lamps that are on most of the evening and are not switched on and off frequently.

CM

Efficient lighting should be encouraged, but banning incandescents goes too far.

There are some applications that currently demand incandescent lights. Along with theatrical lighting, projection systems, and automobile light bulbs already mentioned, add oven lights, certain appliance lights, holiday decorations, fixtures with dimmers, and certain photocell/motion detection fixtures.

John F.

CM writes:

"There are some applications that currently demand incandescent lights. Along with theatrical lighting, projection systems..., appliance lights..."

The California bill does enumerate several exemptions, including those two, but it's well nigh impossible to anticipate and fairly adjudicate all possible reasonable exemptions.

And I agree that banning a technology is myopic, as if innovation in incandescent technology cannot happen. GE just proved that wrong. If there must be restrictions, simply setting a lumen/watt standard and surtaxing bulbs that don't meet it makes more sense than a ban targeted at a specific technology.

Look at the text of the California bill.

http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/07-08/bill/asm/ab_0701-0750/ab_722_bill_20070222_introduced.html

If enacted, I predict there will be all sorts of unintended consequences. Only 25-150 watt bulbs are banned, so we'll be seeing new 24 and 151 watt bulbs on the shelves. And manufacturers will tweak their bulbs slightly so that they can label them "plant bulbs" and "enhanced spectrum bulbs", which are exempt. Bulbs will come in slightly different shapes, because the bill enumerates existing standard bulb shapes as being banned. Incandescent bulb sockets will change, because only the standard medium-screw bulbs are subject to the ban. Etc.

wendy

In my opinion, anybody have right to choose the lamp they use.

Not any incandescent lamps are bad for use. right? Much more incandescent lamps are environment.

I think the incandescent lamps are very useful and cheaper than other kinds of lamps.

Regards,

Wendy

Jim Callahan

ARE THERE ANY GREEN THEATRICAL LIGHTING PRODUCTS?
CM writes:

"There are some applications that currently demand incandescent lights. Along with theatrical lighting, projection systems..., appliance lights..."

City of Orlando is preparing to build a new performing arts center and will be seeking LEED certification. Are there any GREEN theatrical lighting products?

Jim Callahan
Orlando, FL

Jim Callahan

ARE THERE ANY GREEN THEATRICAL LIGHTING PRODUCTS?
CM writes:

"There are some applications that currently demand incandescent lights. Along with theatrical lighting, projection systems..., appliance lights..."

City of Orlando is preparing to build a new performing arts center and will be seeking LEED certification. Are there any GREEN theatrical lighting products?

Jim Callahan
Orlando, FL

Jim Callahan

ARE THERE ANY GREEN THEATRICAL LIGHTING PRODUCTS?
CM writes:

"There are some applications that currently demand incandescent lights. Along with theatrical lighting, projection systems..., appliance lights..."

City of Orlando is preparing to build a new performing arts center and will be seeking LEED certification. Are there any GREEN theatrical lighting products?

Jim Callahan
Orlando, FL

Duncan Munday

It's all very well banning the standard light bulb but in my view the low energy lamps can pollute the environment just as well, they all contain small amounts of mercury and the governments are not doing enough to educate people on the correct disposal of these lamps.

Ace Lamps

Another alternative to compact fluorescents is using LED lamps. They have only been recently introduced to the market, so are costly and not as easy to get compared to current bulbs, but they offer an even lower use of energy saving the environment as well as money

John B

I don't like the idea of a ban. I'm partially-sighted and find it hard to read by the pinkish light of CFLs. I also find CFL light very harsh, more suited to bathrooms or kitchens rather than the living room or bedroom. I intend to stockpile incandescent before they start disappearing from the shops so I can enjoy their warmer orange/yellow light.

Powerwise

You still can't replace the incandescent lamp in your oven. No other type of lamp can take the heat.

And there is not enough clearance in most refrigerators for the base of CFL lamps.

So they can't ban them completely.

Hazardous location lighting

True, we cant do away with them completely, till better, more efficient replacements are invented and made cost effective.

Stephanie Pak

Why not people try solar power as an alternative if all else fails? Solar energy which is coming from the sun can never go wrong since it is totally free and nobody would regret switching to it. For instance, why not try flexible solar panels as a great alternative for lightning purposes to every house. not to mention , that is flexible and portable as well. Who wouldn't want that?

Types of Grow Lights

All ablaze bulbs have to use 25 percent to 30 percent beneath 2014. By 2020, bulbs have to be 70 percent added able than they are today.

Organic Hydroponics

I see the method that here given and it is a easy to utilize . So i will try and i hope it will work for me .

incandescent bulbs

i like this method and i will apply it

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